The closest supermassive black hole to Earth Suddenly Glowing


A research team from the University of California Los Angeles has announced that the black hole at the center of our galaxy , the Milky Way, has suddenly glowed in April and May for the first time since its observation began 24 years ago. and until now the scientist don't know The cause of that violent behavior.
There are several possible explanations for the hole’s strange behaviour. It could have sucked gas from the surface of a star called S0-2, which zoomed past last summer and let loose a mighty belch of gas which may have just reached Sagittarius A*. Another possibility involves a ‘bizarre object’ known as G2, which is probably a pair of binary stars (systems made of two stars orbiting each other). This strange system made a close approach to the black hole in 2014 and it’s possible the dark destroyer sucked gas from the stars.

the first picture ever for the black hole
Sagitarrius A* is the nearest supermassive hole to Earth and is usually more of a slumbering beast than a ravenous monster. But it suddenly appears to be ‘getting hungrier’ and is wolfing down vast amounts of gas, dust and anything else unfortunate enough to be nearby. ‘We have never seen anything like this in the 24 years we have studied the supermassive black hole,’ said Andrea Ghez, UCLA professor of physics and astronomy and a co-senior author of the research exposing the behemoths monumental appetite. ‘It’s usually a pretty quiet, wimpy black hole on a diet. We don’t know what is driving this big feast.’ Astronomers carried out 13,000 observations of the supermassive black hole on 133 different night since 2013.

Read more: https://metro.co.uk/2019/09/12/closest-supermassive-black-hole-earth-getting-hungrier-10728314/?ito=cbshare
Twitter: https://twitter.com/MetroUK | Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MetroUK/
Sagitarrius A* is the nearest supermassive hole to Earth and is usually more of a slumbering beast than a ravenous monster. But it suddenly appears to be ‘getting hungrier’ and is wolfing down vast amounts of gas, dust and anything else unfortunate enough to be nearby. ‘We have never seen anything like this in the 24 years we have studied the supermassive black hole,’ said Andrea Ghez, UCLA professor of physics and astronomy and a co-senior author of the research exposing the behemoths monumental appetite. ‘It’s usually a pretty quiet, wimpy black hole on a diet. We don’t know what is driving this big feast.’ Astronomers carried out 13,000 observations of the supermassive black hole on 133 different night since 2013.

Read more: https://metro.co.uk/2019/09/12/closest-supermassive-black-hole-earth-getting-hungrier-10728314/?ito=cbshare
Twitter: https://twitter.com/MetroUK | Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MetroUK/v
Sagitarrius A* is the nearest supermassive hole to Earth and is usually more of a slumbering beast than a ravenous monster. But it suddenly appears to be ‘getting hungrier’ and is wolfing down vast amounts of gas, dust and anything else unfortunate enough to be nearby. ‘We have never seen anything like this in the 24 years we have studied the supermassive black hole,’ said Andrea Ghez, UCLA professor of physics and astronomy and a co-senior author of the research exposing the behemoths monumental appetite. ‘It’s usually a pretty quiet, wimpy black hole on a diet. We don’t know what is driving this big feast.’ Astronomers carried out 13,000 observations of the supermassive black hole on 133 different night since 2013.

Read more: https://metro.co.uk/2019/09/12/closest-supermassive-black-hole-earth-getting-hungrier-10728314/?ito=cbshare
Twitter: https://twitter.com/MetroUK | Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MetroUK/
Sagitarrius A* is the nearest supermassive hole to Earth and is usually more of a slumbering beast than a ravenous monster. But it suddenly appears to be ‘getting hungrier’ and is wolfing down vast amounts of gas, dust and anything else unfortunate enough to be nearby. ‘We have never seen anything like this in the 24 years we have studied the supermassive black hole,’ said Andrea Ghez, UCLA professor of physics and astronomy and a co-senior author of the research exposing the behemoths monumental appetite. ‘It’s usually a pretty quiet, wimpy black hole on a diet. We don’t know what is driving this big feast.’ Astronomers carried out 13,000 observations of the supermassive black hole on 133 different night since 2013.

Read more: https://metro.co.uk/2019/09/12/closest-supermassive-black-hole-earth-getting-hungrier-10728314/?ito=cbshare
Twitter: https://twitter.com/MetroUK | Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MetroUK/

How will this affect on Earth?

What happened will not affect us clearly on the planet. According to the new study, these rays need to multiply by more than 10 billion times to become harmful, but what is interesting is that this event can help develop our understanding of the evolution of our galaxy.