Singing, Coffee and Sleep … Weird & Fun Activities that Keep your Brain Healthy


Dementia is no longer a condition limited to the elderly or those in old age, so the cognitive functions of the brain are affected, and the laziness of memory has become a symptom inherent in many young people starting from the age of thirties.

Young people often suffer from memory disturbances, an inability to think orderly, lack of familiarity with time and place, and a sudden cessation even from remembering people or daily tasks that they have been doing; If you suffer from these symptoms, and you are under the age of 70, then you must realize that you are on the threshold of going through an aging brain, and in order to get out of it, you have to do several things set by Meg Slig, Professor of Energy Psychology, at St. Louis College in Florence.

To improve the health of your mind, you need to pay attention to this activities that can protect your mind from dementia, whether you are young or close to old age.

singing

If you follow talent-discovery programs for the elderly, the state of mental and physical activity of the attempted people will attract your attention, whether it succeeds or fails, in all cases, their mental and mental presence is remarkable, because singing or playing a musical instrument stimulates mental activity, and removes the specter of dementia.

In a study presented by researchers at the Finnish University of Helsinki on the benefits of singing, they discovered that elderly singers have more mental and cognitive flexibility than other non-music hobbyists and singers of the same age group. 

Singing in groups develops feelings of bonding between the team and protects them from the disturbing effects of loneliness on mental health.

Sauna

Many studies have linked the use of “sauna” with the prevention of Alzheimer’s, because it’s an effective treatment, it revitalizes the body through heat, improves cardiovascular performance, reduces inflammation, and regulates sleep, with the need to pay attention to the fact that high temperatures are not suitable for everyone. 

Practicing Tai chi

Tai chi is a slow-motion exercise for meditation and self-defense, and it is more beneficial than other sports that contribute to the preservation of mental abilities, and according to much research, tai chi stopped the progression of dementia in a number of people with weak mental abilities, and improved their cognitive functions in a similar way to the types Other exercises and cognitive exercises.

Get a good night’s sleep. 

While researchers are still trying to determine the relationship of sleep to the prevention of dementia, many studies report that sleep seems to clear the brain of harmful waste products that are associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

Love your age

As Meg says, “See your aging as a good thing, and that good things await you. Don’t let bad times affect your days ahead.”

Cranberry and green tea

Cranberry, green tea and dark chocolate contain these flavonoids that contribute to reducing inflammation, reducing the incidence of dementia and preventing Alzheimer’s.

Drink coffee

Coffee has a greater effect than its ability to raise focus in the short term. Drinking 3 cups per day in the middle age period reduces the incidence of Alzheimer’s during aging.

Find a goal

Try to strive for what you set for yourself, whether it is supporting your small family, volunteering in the community, learning new skills, or participating in public activities, this is what makes your life meaningful, and stimulates your mind towards recovery and stimulation of the brain. 

The goal you are looking for does not have to be fun, pleasure is not the goal, but you may get it as a result, the real goal is to find a task in your life that you seek to achieve.

Sources:

  • https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/02/210210133432.htm
  • https://www.psychologytoday.com/intl/blog/changepower/202102/10-odd-and-fun-activities-keep-your-brain-healthy?fbclid=IwAR19DDdV8Ez6C7mVsdO39MnLxyc-qPsBPQX6osJb9oUTfdjO5i7bYFyCXlk
  • https://www.psychologytoday.com/intl/blog/finding-new-home/202102/could-sauna-bathing-have-cognitive-benefits